ARTICLES

Blog

Adult games are a great way to break the ice with someone new, or to spice things up in the bedroom! If you feel like getting creative next time you’re getting down and dirty, try out some of these games!

Continue reading “Adult Games To Intensify Your Next Booking”

Expand your vocabulary and get inspiration for your next booking with this A to Z list of Kinks, Fetishes and Sex Acts!

A is for Analingus: also known as rimming, this is the oral stimulation of someone’s anus.

B is for Blindfold: the sensory deprivation of not being able to see your partner is a serious turn-on!

C is for Cunnilingus: this is the technical term for oral sex performed on a woman.

D is for Deepthroat: a seriously intense BJ experience featured in plenty of Porn Star Experiences.

E is for Exhibition: the sexual gratification of being watched while getting dirty. To match, there’s Voyeurism which is the sexual gratification of watching others.

F is for Flavour: with flavoured dams, condoms and lube, there’s no shortage of flavours you can have in the bedroom.

Bonus!

F is for Food Play: Going hand-in-hand with flavoured lube and condoms is food play, like licking chocolate sauce or whipped cream off your partner’s body.

G is for Greek: more commonly referred to as Anal, this is the penetration of an anus.

H is for Humiliation: any physical or verbal form of humiliation by either party.

I is for Impact play: and whether you want to punish or BE punished, there are all sorts of toys available.

J is for JOI: Jerk-Off Instructions can be part of edging or humiliation scenes which are a great way to break the ice before launching into fun together.

K is for Katoptronophilia: that real mouthful of a word means arousal from having sex in front of a mirror. If the thought of watching yourself with one of our babes gets you going, consider upgrading to our more lavish suites.

L is for Leather Fetish: Attraction to the look, feel, or smell of leather clothing or accessories.

M is for Masochism: Masochists derive pleasure from their own pain, and are the perfect partner to Sadists who derive pleasure from other people’s pain

N is for Nylon Fetish: Sexual interest in stockings, pantyhose, or other nylon-based clothing.

Bonus!

N is for Narratophilia: This refers to the (increasingly popular) pleasure derived from writing, reading or listening to explicit stories.

O is for Orgasm Control:  this is the act of drawing out the time spent on the cusp of orgasm.

P is for Pegging: to stimulate the prostate for a mind-blowing orgasm, let a lady step into a strap-on for some pegging.

Q is for Quirophilia: Foot fetishes are pretty common, on the other hand… Hands! Quirophilia is arousal from someone’s hands.

R is for RolePlay: schoolgirl & teacher, flight attendant, nurse, mailman, the possibilities are endless!

S is for Squirting: also called female ejaculation, squirting is the release of fluid during a woman’s climax.

Bonus!

S is for Spanish: this honourable mention is what most people call a tit-job!

T is for Testicle Torture: also known as ballbusting, this is the painful stimulation of the testes like squeezing or hitting.

U is for Urophilia: more commonly known as Golden Showers, this fetish is for all things urine-related.

V is for Vanilla: And it’s okay if nothing on this list interests you because being vanilla is still pretty sweet!

W is for Whips: whips make themselves at home next to floggers, paddles and canes for impact play.

X is for XXX: the classic symbol of adult-only-content. Throwback to old-school pornos, anyone?

Bonus!

X is for waX play! I know it’s a stretch but the temperature change is exhilarating so it’s worth a mention!

Y is for Yiff: A fetish related to anthropomorphic animals, commonly within the furry community.

Z is for Zelophilia: this goes hand-in-hand with cuckolding; Zelophilia is the sexual arousal from feeling jealousy.

Now that you’ve explored this A to Z list of Kinks, Fetishes and Sex acts, why not make a booking and try some out?

Unlike many countries where sex work is illegal or heavily restricted, Australia has a complex legal landscape that varies from state to state and territory to territory. These laws can make booking some company seem daunted, but rest assured that Harlots is licensed and law-abiding in all our establishments.

New South Wales: Decriminalisation

New South Wales (NSW) was the first Australian state to decriminalise sex work in 1995. Under the NSW framework, sex work is a legitimate occupation. Sex workers have the right to work independently or in licensed brothels, ensuring their safety and protection. This approach has been praised for reducing the risks associated with sex work and promoting the rights of sex workers.

Victoria: Licensing and Regulation

Victoria, another progressive state, adopted a licensing and regulation model in 1994. Sex work is legal when conducted in licensed brothels or as part of an individual’s sole trader business. This model aims to strike a balance between protecting sex workers’ rights and maintaining public health and safety standards. Licensed brothels in Victoria are subject to strict regulations and regular inspections.

Queensland: Licensing with Restrictions

Queensland has legalised sex work but with specific restrictions. Brothels are licensed and regulated, but street-based sex work is illegal. This approach seeks to manage the sex industry while minimising its visibility in public spaces. Queensland also has a unique “legalisation” model, distinct from NSW’s decriminalisation and Victoria’s licensing.

South Australia: Licensing and Criminalisation

South Australia operates under a licensing and criminalisation model. Brothels are regulated, and sex work is generally considered legal when conducted in licensed establishments. However, street-based sex work remains illegal in some areas. South Australia’s approach reflects a mix of legalised and criminalised elements.

Western Australia: Partial Criminalisation

In Western Australia, sex work remains partially criminalised. Street-based sex work is illegal, but private sex work and working in licensed brothels are legal and regulated. Western Australia’s laws are more conservative than other states.

Tasmania: Criminalisation

Tasmania has some of the most restrictive sex work laws in Australia. All forms of sex work are illegal except for sole operators who can work alone. Brothels are illegal, and the state has not adopted a regulated approach like Victoria or New South Wales.

The Australian Capital Territory (ACT): Legalisation and Regulation

The ACT adopted a legalisation and regulation model in 1992. Sex work is legal, and licensed brothels operate under strict regulations. This approach emphasises health and safety standards and recognises sex work as a legitimate profession.

While Australia hasn’t settled on a single approach to sex work, the variation in laws from state to state and territory to territory demonstrates the complex nature of the issue. While some states have embraced decriminalization or legalization, others maintain more conservative stances. The ongoing debate surrounding sex work laws in Australia underscores the importance of continued dialogue and thoughtful policymaking. It’s crucial to consider the experiences and perspectives of sex workers when writing laws on sex work; regulated legalisation is often deemed by those in the industry as the best way to keep sex workers safe and provide access to appropriate resources.